We are everything

Nick | 18 | 1st Year Interior Architecture major at UNSW.

This blog contains bits of everything, I suppose! Lots of rocks, birds, and screaming about things, especially video games. Please tread carefully, I wouldn't want you to get injured, I'm not trained in first aid. Also, I'm very prone architecture and interiors spam, just a heads up.

I also have an art blog.

I will tag certain things to make blogging easier for you, all you have to do is ask! c: I also blog in excess during ungodly hours of the morning, so bit of a disclaimer there.

lorenz-attractor:

nick and I have been together for a whole year 

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I tried to post this last night but:

Hi, tumblr. I hope you’re doing well. If I haven’t been around a lot, I apologize. I haven’t been well (understatement) and I’m still trying to sort myself out and trying to get better.

Anyway, I hope y’all keep being the fresh as hell kids that you are. Keep posting and reblogging things that you all love, okay?

.

vampirecoral:

dunwall murder dad, corvo attano. this is a late gift for nickvinsky! c:

(ps, in case you didn’t get the memo, i used to be hardinhightown!)

8DDDDD

andrewarcher:

Sharing Alike, mixed media 2008

I’m also up on instagram & facebook - thanks

(via cortnan)

roguetelemetry:

Ian mcque (via Pin by Randy Jones on Stuff I like | Pinterest)

(via saint-rupert)

subhumann:

I love you… I always have and I always will.

(via spacerocketbunny)

likeafieldmouse:

Gustave Caillebotte - The Floor Scrapers (1875-6)

Original on top, later version below

"Despite the effort Caillebotte put into the painting, it was rejected by France’s most prestigious art exhibition, The Salon, in 1875. The depiction of working-class people in their trade, not fully clothed, shocked the jurors and was deemed a ‘vulgar subject matter.’ 

The images of the floor scrapers came to be associated with Degas’s paintings of washerwomen, also presented at the same exhibition and similarly scorned as ‘vulgar’”.

(via xfreischutz)

bluart106:

Two men dancing, Harlem, 1920s.

According to George Chauncey’s eponymous Gay New York, the Harlem Renaissance of the ’20s provided an opportunity for gay men to create their own social and cultural spaces within the burgeoning nightlife in the neighborhood. 

(via stonelionhearts)

art-and-fury:

Red Veil - Adam Caldwell

(via theboyofcheese)

Dolce & Gabbana Spring 2015

(via yeahyeahyeaaah)